What is MY design for marketing?

That’s the question I set out to answer with my 30 Day Crazy Marketing Experiment, which I just completed last week.

Here’s a recap of my experiment:

I tested four different marketing approaches, one for each week, and documented the process.

Week #1 Generating — Doing it all WRONG (according to my Human Design type.) Lots of inviting, initiating, busting my butt, making offers, and selling all the time.

Week #2 Waiting for the Invitation — Marketing like a Projector: waiting for recognition and invitations before selling, going at a slower pace.

Week #3 Storytelling — Ditching the marketing focus altogether and simply telling stories.

Week #4 Intuitive Marketing — Following whatever I’m lead to do. It might be “typical” selling one day, story-telling the next, or even nothing at all.

Now I’m going to share my insights (so far) from this experiment. But before I do, a warning…

This is NOT to give a formula or prescription for “effective marketing,” or even for “soul aligned” marketing.

If you choose to learn from my experience — and I hope you find it useful for that — my intention is to inspire you to explore your own design for marketing. Not following the system that works for me or anyone else.

You do you.

In marketing. In business. In life.

*Stepping off soapbox now*

Steph’s Crazy Marketing Experience Insights

#1 – Track your numbers to make it tangible and fun.

I created a spreadsheet to track the following metrics daily during my experiment:

  • Invitations for a Wild Creation
  • Sales proposals
  • Connections on social media
  • LinkedIn messages sent
  • Max post engagement
  • Energy level (1-10)
  • Inspiration level (1-10)
  • Bitterness level (1-10)
  • Appointments scheduled
  • Money earned

Having a target for each day and tracking my results made it both challenging and attainable.

Admittedly, I went overboard with tracking. I’m going to cut it down by 50% or more in subsequent experiments.

I’d suggest tracking no more than 5 metrics (unless you’re a tracking fanatic) to make it easy.

#2 – Choose an easy, sustainable pace.

I didn’t hit my target actions every single day because the pace was just too much for me.

For generator types, emailing 25 people in a day or creating 5 pieces of content might be perfect.

But I discovered that going all out for seven days a week is not my style. I’m dialing it down to five days, with weekly targets rather than daily ones, to make it realistic for my energy and marketing style.

#3 – Allow room to follow your intuition and inspiration.

My output was highly variable.

One day I might create four pieces of content. The next I might create none.

When I was riding the Inspiration Wave, it was so much easier to create ideas, content and connections.

Giving myself the flexibility to go fast when I’m inspired and to slow down when I’m not will make this sustainable over the long haul.

#4 – Your energy level will vary, sometimes dramatically.

Some days I felt like I could run a Marketing Marathon.

Other days, I just wanted to lie in bed and binge watch Fleabag. (If you love uncomfortable UK humor, that series is a must, by the way.)

That’s another reason I’m building flexibility into my marketing plan.

#5 – Consistency trumps everything.

If I measured my results by any one week, it barely moves the needle.

But if I look at my results over the entire duration of the experiment, I can have dozens of new relationships on social media, powerful one-on-one conversations, potential clients and increased visibility.

Whatever I choose, it’s got to be consistent actions over time to get traction.

#6 – The more fun you have, the easier it is.

This seems obvious, but how many times to we try to force ourselves to do the “right” thing rather than asking…

“How can I make this easy and fun?”

If you marketing is fun, do you think you’ll do it more?

Yeppers.

And if it sucks, are you more likely to give up?

Deux yep.

I kept on connecting and did some “traditional” marketing during my storytelling week, and I was having so much fun delighting myself with stories that it boosted my energy.

#7 – The simpler your marketing plan, the better.

In hindsight, I tried to do too many things at once by focusing on both LinkedIn and Facebook.

One social media network was plenty.

I probably could have gotten more results by focusing my energy in one place than the combined results of trying to focus on two.

#8 – Energy, inspiration and results will be unpredictable.

While there are certain common sense strategies that lead to results: creating content designed for your ideal clients, asking questions to engage people, inviting people to benefit-rich conversations, for example…

The actual results I got were unpredictable.

One of my blog posts got over 115 comments in someone else’s Facebook group. (That was a lot for me.)

One my freebie offers, which was really good if I do say so myself, got ZERO takers.

There’s an unpredictable X-Factor in everything we do. Sometimes results will be exponentially greater than expected, other times, the exact opposite.

My Challenge to You

If you’ve followed me this far, I challenge you to create your own Marketing Experiment.

Choose even ONE action to track for a period of 30 days. Something that will attract clients and sales for you over time.

If you focused on that for just one month, what might happen?

How many people could you help?

How much money and value could you create?

What ONE SPECIFIC ACTION can you take daily to make the greatest contribution to your life and business?

This is really just the beginning of my experiment. I’ve learned a lot, but there’s still tons more to test and experience.

Which brings me to what this is REALLY all about:

Noticing what’s aligned, what it feels like to be in and out of alignment, and choosing more of that.

I’m committed to creating my life first and designing a business to sustain it.

Who’s with me?

If you’d like to create your own 30 Day Marketing Experiment, let’s have a virtual coffee and Wild Creation chat!

Yours in creative play,

Steph